Author Topic: JungkeBiker's IT250J build  (Read 8599 times)

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Offline wishiwas16again

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #80 on: May 11, 2019, 12:30:36 AM »
I'm going to do a 12v DC conversion topic at the end of the month.

Gathering parts as we speak!

Cheers,

Dave R.

Look forward to that  :)  I like electrical challenges.

Offline Cooky375

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #81 on: May 11, 2019, 07:38:27 PM »
Nice job sorting it out. The way I see it is if it has two wheels,runs and you can't have fun on it it's not the bike.

Too true

Offline JungleBiker

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #82 on: May 11, 2019, 08:40:58 PM »
Nice job sorting it out. The way I see it is if it has two wheels,runs and you can't have fun on it it's not the bike.

      I admit, I tend to have as much if not more fun resurrecting old bikes as I do riding them.
--Badly abused 1982 Yamaha IT250J in the process of being resurrected.
--1967 Norton P11 (US project bike)
--1985 Armstrong MT500 (UK rider)
--1985 Honda XR600/628R (PNG daily rider)
-- lots of other junk spread across several US states and two big islands

Offline T.RexRacing

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #83 on: May 11, 2019, 11:50:58 PM »
      I admit, I tend to have as much if not more fun resurrecting old bikes as I do riding them.

Well there's that too. :D
Whatever you do will be insignificant, but it is very important that you do it.
- Mahatma Gandhi

Offline Cooky375

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #84 on: May 12, 2019, 05:37:27 PM »
Yeah it is nice turning some one else?s scrap into your treasure.

Online Bigusdickus

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #85 on: May 12, 2019, 06:46:27 PM »
Jungle biker how are you getting on with the DRZ forks. My brothers PE now has RM 125 forks that work very well  and the husky now has a set of Honda XR forks, at the moment untested. We never got a satisfactory ride from the DRZ set up, I would love to know what you think of them.

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Offline JungleBiker

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #86 on: May 12, 2019, 10:41:19 PM »
Jungle biker how are you getting on with the DRZ forks. My brothers PE now has RM 125 forks that work very well  and the husky now has a set of Honda XR forks, at the moment untested. We never got a satisfactory ride from the DRZ set up, I would love to know what you think of them.

Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk

        The ones I used were not DRZ--they came off of a mid 1990's DR350.  I forget exactly which variation of the DR350--I took them off of a bike in a breaker's yard in Tennessee and shipped them here to PNG thinking to put them on the front of a DR250 here that had been wrecked.  As it turned out, the DR250 got sold to somebody else who wasn't interested in buying my DR front end, so it just sat around for years.  At one point I tried to loan them to a mate to put on his XR400 while he rebuilt the XR fork, but he had them on just long enough to discover that they wouldn't compress and gave them back to me.

         I put them on the IT, (along with the Suzuki triple clamps/yokes), even though I knew they weren't right.  I reckoned I might be able to sort them out.  When I finally got around to investigating them, I discovered that each fork leg had new seals and unused fork oil, but almost twice as much fork oil as was needed.  Hours of research turned up confusing info about how much oil goes in these forks, some years call for one quantity, others call for another quantity, even though all the DR250/350's from about 1990 to 1998 (if I remember correctly) use the same part number for the front fork assemblies!  And just to add to the confusion, although the quantities called for vary by around 40cc's or so, the oil level only varies by 1mm.

         In the end I drained all the fluid into a clean container and then put back in the amount required to bring the oil level up to 145mm from the top (cap and spring removed and fork leg compressed).  After that, they behaved normally--that is to say that they no longer felt like they had only 3 inches of travel.  Now they seem to have their full 11 inches or whatever they are supposed to have and the whole package feels pretty good, it feels like a surprisingly good match to the rear suspension.  I haven't even had to mess with the spring preload or dampening settings, though I may yet do once I've put a few more miles on it.

          I'm not sure why they were so overfilled; obviously somebody rebuilt the fork just before it went into the junkyard, I'm guessing that maybe they adjusted the oil level to 145mm from the top with the cap off, but with the spring in and the fork leg extended?  That's my best guess.
--Badly abused 1982 Yamaha IT250J in the process of being resurrected.
--1967 Norton P11 (US project bike)
--1985 Armstrong MT500 (UK rider)
--1985 Honda XR600/628R (PNG daily rider)
-- lots of other junk spread across several US states and two big islands

Offline JungleBiker

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #87 on: May 13, 2019, 11:51:11 PM »
I'm going to do a 12v DC conversion topic at the end of the month.

Gathering parts as we speak!

Cheers,

Dave R.

      By the way, Dave, where will this info be published?  Somewhere here on the forum?
--Badly abused 1982 Yamaha IT250J in the process of being resurrected.
--1967 Norton P11 (US project bike)
--1985 Armstrong MT500 (UK rider)
--1985 Honda XR600/628R (PNG daily rider)
-- lots of other junk spread across several US states and two big islands

Offline JungleBiker

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #88 on: May 18, 2019, 01:49:14 PM »

       FINALLY got a chance to drop the needle 1 notch.  It's an improvement, but I still feel like it should run smoother in the lower mid range.  I've got the main and the needle more or less "sorted" I think, I guess now I need to fiddle with the low speed jet. 

       It feels fast.  I know that doesn't mean anything, but the terrain around me seems more blurry than I am used to...  Of course, part of it could be because it seems to run best when I whack the throttle wide open immediately after every shift.  The problem then is that I quickly run out of gears. 

       I'm very glad I put that disc brake on the front.
--Badly abused 1982 Yamaha IT250J in the process of being resurrected.
--1967 Norton P11 (US project bike)
--1985 Armstrong MT500 (UK rider)
--1985 Honda XR600/628R (PNG daily rider)
-- lots of other junk spread across several US states and two big islands

Offline JungleBiker

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Re: JungkeBiker's IT250J build
« Reply #89 on: May 18, 2019, 03:29:31 PM »

      Still impressed more than I thought I would be by the rear suspension, too.  It just seems to soak stuff up better than I would ever have guessed.  Dare I admit that it may even be making me question how great progressive linkage suspension really is?

      Anybody tried a Smart Carb on one of these?  I see quite a bit of discussion about Lectrons on the forum, but so far I've found nothing about Smart Carbs.
--Badly abused 1982 Yamaha IT250J in the process of being resurrected.
--1967 Norton P11 (US project bike)
--1985 Armstrong MT500 (UK rider)
--1985 Honda XR600/628R (PNG daily rider)
-- lots of other junk spread across several US states and two big islands